Martin Creed

Born in 1968 in Wakefield, England; lives in London, England

Biography

1986–1990 Studied art at the Slade School of Art, London

2001 Winner of the Turner Prize

Visual Art

Visual Art

Martin Creed approaches art making with humor, anxiety, and experimentation, and with the sensibility of a musician and composer, underpinning everything he does with his open ambiguity about what art is.

...more/images

Among Creed’s most well-known works is the installation Work No. 200: Half the Air in a Given Space from 1998. The title is also the work’s instruction—the artist calculates and fills the volume of half of the room with white balloons, which the viewers are then invited in to.

In 2001, Creed was awarded the Turner Prize for Work No 227: The Lights Going On and Off, which was exactly what its title describes, in an empty gallery. At that time, he left his exhibition space in London’s Tate Gallery empty and merely manipulated the timer of the lighting, which meant that the visitors found themselves not only in the empty room, but also repeatedly in the dark.

Author: Lona Gaikis

...less
Music

Music

In 1994 Creed was a founding member of the band Owada. In 2001 he created his own music label »Telephone Records«. Between the repetition of chords and lyrics, Creed’s music contrasts elements of punk style with country music, and musical improvisation with lo-fi aesthetics.

In the Exhibition

In the Exhibition

Martin Creed

How I wrote … Thinking/Not Thinking, 2011, with Martin Creed (voc., git.) and Band, 3:00 min

Film: The Guardian

Hi, my name is Martin Creed and this is my band, Keiko, Be, Rob and Genevieve, and this song that we are gonna play now, that we are gonna try to play, is called »Thinking / Not Thinking«.

I was trying to describe what living is like, and I was thinking that living consists of thinking, and not thinking, you know? And that’s just about it. So I tried to put that in a song and its got two chords in it: there’s a chord for thinking, and a chord for not thinking, and that’s the way it goes, thinking, and not thinking.

I don’t know if its better to think or not to think, but I think it probably better not to think.

Author:

Lona Gaikis / Corinne Bannister